Connect with others who understand.

sign up log in
About MyHeartDiseaseTeam

What Is Heart Failure?

Updated on November 01, 2021
Medically reviewed by
Glenn Gandelman, M.D., M.P.H.
Article written by
Kristopher Bunting, M.D.

  • Heart failure is a serious — but manageable — chronic health condition.
  • The terms heart failure (HF) and congestive heart failure (CHF) are often used interchangeably, but CHF is a specific type of heart failure.
  • If you have heart failure, there are treatments and lifestyle changes to improve your well-being.

A diagnosis of heart failure can be scary, especially if you do not know exactly what that means. When one thinks of an organ “failing,” it may bring to mind a body part that completely shuts down and ceases to function, but this is not the case.

Heart failure means the heart is not pumping blood efficiently and cannot keep up with the body’s needs. The heart is still beating, but for a variety of reasons it is not currently working the way that it should.

Heart failure is a serious, chronic condition that affects more than 64 million people worldwide. Current data shows that 6.2 million adults in the United States have heart failure. The prevalence of heart failure has steadily increased over the past few decades and is highest in people over 60 years old.

Heart failure is a serious condition, but it can be managed with medical treatment and lifestyle changes.

Heart Failure Defined

Heart failure means the heart is pumping, but the amount of blood it can pump cannot meet the body’s needs. Heart failure does not mean that the heart has completely stopped functioning (cardiac arrest) or that it will stop at any moment.

Heart failure is also different from a heart attack, also called a myocardial infarction. A heart attack occurs when the blood flow through the coronary arteries that feed the heart muscle is cut off or severely reduced.

Causes of Heart Failure

Heart failure can be caused by any damage to the heart that makes it more difficult for the heart to pump blood. Many types of heart disease can cause heart failure, including high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, heart attack, heart valve disease, and irregular heartbeat (abnormal heart rhythm or arrhythmia).

When the heart experiences acute injury (like a heart attack) and long-term injury (like high blood pressure), the heart attempts to compensate by enlarging, increasing in muscle mass (hypertrophy), or pumping faster.

These physical changes in the heart muscle are called cardiac remodeling. Over time these changes lead to heart dysfunction and chronic heart failure. The body also tries to compensate for reduced blood flow by narrowing blood vessels to increase blood pressure and restricting blood flow to certain organs.

Ultimately, these attempts to make up for poor heart function fail, the heart cannot pump enough blood, and symptoms of heart failure appear.

Other Risk Factors

Health concerns that increase the risk of heart disease also increase risk of heart failure. These include obesity, high cholesterol, diabetes, kidney disease, and tobacco use. Congenital heart defects and thyroid disease can also contribute to heart failure.

Types of Heart Failure

There are different types of heart failure, categorized by how the heart is malfunctioning. The various types of HF can cause different symptoms and require different treatments.

Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive heart failure is often referred to simply as heart failure, but it is actually a specific type of heart failure. CHF occurs when blood returning to the heart backs up in the veins because the heart is unable to pump properly. CHF frequently causes swelling (edema) in the legs and ankles. CHF can also cause pulmonary edema, excess fluid in the lungs. Weight gain with CHF can be a sign of fluid retention.

Left-Sided Heart Failure

The left ventricle of the heart is responsible for the bulk of the heart’s pumping function. Left-sided heart failure means the left ventricle is not able to adequately pump oxygen-rich blood from the lungs throughout the body. This can lead to excess fluid buildup in the lungs that causes shortness of breath. There are two types of left-sided HF, systolic heart failure and diastolic heart failure.

Systolic Heart Failure

This type of left-sided heart failure is also called heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. It occurs when the left ventricle becomes enlarged and weakened, making it more difficult for the heart to contract. Because it cannot contract properly, the left ventricle fails to pump, or eject, blood efficiently. Systolic heart failure reduces your ejection fraction, an important measure of how well the heart pumps blood.

Diastolic Heart Failure

Diastolic heart failure, which is also called heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, occurs when the left ventricle becomes thickened and stiff and cannot relax properly. This means that the left ventricle is not able to fill with blood as it should, making pumping less efficient.

Right-Sided Heart Failure

Right-sided heart failure affects the right ventricle and is often a result of left-sided heart failure. The right ventricle is responsible for pumping blood into the lungs to receive oxygen. Right-sided HF can lead to blood backing up into the veins, causing swelling in the legs and feet as well as the abdomen (ascites).

If You Are Diagnosed With Heart Failure

Heart failure is a chronic and often progressive condition that can have a tremendous impact on your quality of life. It can make you feel tired, weak, short of breath, and unable to do the things you enjoy, but there is hope.

Treatment and lifestyle changes can slow the progression of HF and reduce symptoms. In the early stages, treatment may even reverse some cases of HF.

Treatments for Heart Failure

The primary treatments for heart failure are medication, lifestyle changes, and, in severe cases, surgery — including heart transplant. Heart failure may also require the implantation of a pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) to control your heart rate and prevent life-threatening conditions, such as arrhythmia and cardiac arrest.

Your doctor may prescribe more than one medication and will likely counsel you on important lifestyle changes that can make a big difference in your prognosis. Medications for heart failure include beta blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), diuretics, digoxin, anti-arrhythmic drugs, and blood thinners.

Lifestyle Changes

No matter what treatment your doctor recommends, you can adopt healthy lifestyle habits to support your well-being. It may seem overwhelming at first, but even small steps can make a huge difference. Important lifestyle changes include eating a low-sodium diet, controlling your weight, exercising, and quitting smoking.

Seeking support from friends, family, and others living with heart failure can also help you stick to your lifestyle changes. Your teammates at MyHeartDiseaseTeam are always available to answer questions about their own experiences and offer support.

Exercise and Heart Failure

Until the late 1980s, doctors discouraged people with heart failure from exercising. Today exercise is often an important part of a treatment plan for HF. Physical activity is known to have many benefits for your heart health and overall well-being, including increased energy, improved circulation, and greater muscle strength.

Heart failure can significantly limit your ability to safely perform physical activity, so it is important to start slow and watch for heart symptoms. What works for a family member or friend with heart failure may not be right for you.

Your doctor can help you determine which types of exercise are best for you based on the specifics of your condition and any other illnesses you may have. Always consult your doctor before trying a new workout.

Living With Heart Failure

You can live a full life with heart failure, and there are steps you can take every day to support your health and quality of life. Read more about what to expect when living with heart failure.

Ready to talk to your doctor about heart failure? Download these questions to ask your doctor and take them to your next appointment.

How do you manage your heart failure symptoms? Share in the comments below.

Glenn Gandelman, M.D., M.P.H. is assistant clinical professor of medicine at New York Medical College and in private practice specializing in cardiovascular disease in Greenwich, Connecticut. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Learn more about him here.
Kristopher Bunting, M.D. studied chemistry and life sciences at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, and received his doctor of medicine degree from Tulane University. Learn more about him here.

Recent articles

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) causes the heart muscle to thicken, preventing the heart from...

Could You Have Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy? Understanding Causes and Symptoms

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) causes the heart muscle to thicken, preventing the heart from...
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is underdiagnosed and frequently misdiagnosed.Many diseases can...

How Is Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Diagnosed?

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is underdiagnosed and frequently misdiagnosed.Many diseases can...
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has the potential to cause dangerous health...

What To Expect With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Life Expectancy and Complications

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has the potential to cause dangerous health...
Many treatments are available for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and new treatments are on...

How Is Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Treated?

Many treatments are available for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and new treatments are on...
Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are associated with an increased risk of heart disease....

Psoriasis, Psoriatic Arthritis, and Heart Disease: Understanding the Connection

Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are associated with an increased risk of heart disease....
Heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are frequently associated with...

Lung Cancer and Heart Disease: Understanding the Connection

Heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are frequently associated with...
You can start a conversation with your doctor about ways to improve your heart failure symptoms...

Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Heart Failure

You can start a conversation with your doctor about ways to improve your heart failure symptoms...
If you have heart failure, you can support your heart health with choices you make every...

What to Expect When Living With Heart Failure

If you have heart failure, you can support your heart health with choices you make every...
Receiving a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation, or AFib, can be scary and overwhelming. You may...

Living Well With Atrial Fibrillation

Receiving a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation, or AFib, can be scary and overwhelming. You may...
Exercising with atrial fibrillation (AFib) can be both safe and beneficial for your health.To...

Tips for Exercising With Atrial Fibrillation

Exercising with atrial fibrillation (AFib) can be both safe and beneficial for your health.To...
MyHeartDiseaseTeam My heart disease Team

Thank you for signing up.

close