On This 🩺 Medical Monday, 🩺 We Learn About Palpitations And SVT Treatments. | MyHeartDiseaseTeam

Connect with others who understand.

sign up Log in
Resources
About MyHeartDiseaseTeam
Powered By
Real members of MyHeartDiseaseTeam have posted questions and answers that support our community guidelines, and should not be taken as medical advice. Looking for the latest medically reviewed content by doctors and experts? Visit our resource section.

On This 🩺 Medical Monday, 🩺 We Learn About Palpitations And SVT Treatments.

A MyHeartDiseaseTeam Member asked a question 💭

Presented by Dr. Mario Talajic - Canadian Heart Rhythm Society

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkYJF24RJ44

posted July 1
View reactions
A MyHeartDiseaseTeam Member

@A MyHeartDiseaseTeam Member Thanks so much for sharing all of this with us. Like you, I have episodes of my heart just stopping. I am going to discuss some of these devices with my EP when I see him in September. My issues are part of a congenital valve deformity and the ventricle may be too small on the right side to do any of this. I will be seeing a congenital heart specialist at Emory next April. I am hoping he will have some ideas Like you, my heart is very enlarged and I have heart failure, I never have any chest pain and no plaque buildup. Thanks again for all the info and I hope you are looking forward to a nice holiday. Hugs🤗

posted July 3
A MyHeartDiseaseTeam Member

Caryn,

Outstanding video. I was diagnosed with Paroxysmal AFIB in 2019 and went the medication route of beta blocker and blood thinner. As I started having more episodes due to triggers like sinus infections or root canal infections they would trigger episodes. Finally had a team of ER doctors bring in Cardiology and Electro-Physiologist (EP) and sent me down the path of Dofetilide and then an Ablation. I wore a holter monitor and it did record less than 1% of PAC's and PVC's in a two week period but no AFIB. Wish I had seen this video back years ago. He explained things so well. Thank you for sharing. I think there should be a catalog i.e. Library where a link to these wonderful video's could be on the menu for those people visiting the site as well as those of us who have been on this site to review as well. I do have many senior moments.

posted July 1
A MyHeartDiseaseTeam Member

Let's dive into palpitations and treatments for supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) based on the provided context.

Palpitations
Palpitations are sensations where you feel your heart beating irregularly, too quickly, or too strongly. They can be caused by various factors, including stress, caffeine, or underlying heart c... read more

Let's dive into palpitations and treatments for supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) based on the provided context.

Palpitations
Palpitations are sensations where you feel your heart beating irregularly, too quickly, or too strongly. They can be caused by various factors, including stress, caffeine, or underlying heart conditions like Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome.

SVT Treatments
SVT is a condition where the heart beats very quickly due to abnormal electrical pathways. Here are some treatments for SVT, particularly in the context of WPW syndrome:

1. Vagal Maneuvers
- Purpose: Stimulate the vagus nerve to help return the heart to a normal rhythm.
- Techniques:
- Coughing forcefully
- Holding your breath
- Performing the Valsalva maneuver (pinching your nose, closing your mouth, and exhaling while bearing down)
- Applying an ice pack or cold water to the face (especially for infants and young children)
- Note: Always discuss these maneuvers with a healthcare provider as they may not be suitable for everyone.

2. Medication
- Antiarrhythmic Drugs: Used to treat WPW arrhythmias during episodes of SVT.
- Examples: Adenosine, Verapamil (Calan), Metoprolol (Lopressor)
- Administration: Typically injected during an SVT episode.

3. Cardioversion
- Chemical Cardioversion: Use of medication to correct abnormal heart rhythm.
- Electrical Cardioversion: Use of an electric shock under sedation to treat SVT when other methods fail.

4. Catheter Ablation
- Procedure: Destruction of the abnormal electrical pathway causing WPW.
- Method: A cardiac catheter is used to kill the cells with heat or cold at the precise location of the conduction abnormality.
- Outcome: Can be a permanent cure for WPW.

5. Observation
- When Used: For individuals with WPW who have no symptoms.
- Approach: Regular follow-up to monitor for symptoms and ECG changes.

Conclusion
Understanding the various treatments for SVT, especially in the context of WPW syndrome, can help manage and potentially cure the condition. Always consult with a healthcare provider to determine the best treatment plan for your specific situation.

 This AI-generated response comes from MyHeartDiseaseTeam and other selected sources. It is not a substitute for medical advice. Always ask your doctor about specific health concerns.

Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: Your Guide | MyHeartDiseaseTeam
Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Treatment and Medication | MyHeartDiseaseTeam
posted July 1
A MyHeartDiseaseTeam Member

@A MyHeartDiseaseTeam Member, I will bring you your suggestion at the ambassador meeting for consideration by the site managers. I would love to have a video section on the site too. Until then all of the videos I post can be found in the Q&A section. Use the search on that page for what you want to learn more about and they should come up. If not if you let me know what you are interested in I can be sure to search for something like this video. I liked his explanation as well.

posted July 3
A MyHeartDiseaseTeam Member

Nice little explanation, I suffer with severe SVTs and PVCs. I have coronary artery disease involving native coronary artery of native heart without angina pectoris. I don't have chest pains i will just fall out because my heart will stop beating. For years I thought I was clumsy and moving to fast but never knew why. Even after suffering an AMI/ STEMI widowmaker with massive irreversible progressive damage it was still happening. On one of my many 3 day observation stays because they couldn't figure out what was happening i had several of those episodes sitting in my hospital bed. My cardiologist said he didn't know what was reviving me, but for a moment I had died. It isn't a slight problem, I now have an A-ICD and am monitored 24/7. I get alert from my hospital letting me know that I have been in SVTs for hours or a combination of SVTs and PVCs. My device has a CRTD built in that works to correct my severe arrhythmia problems.
I've never felt my heart racing or pounding or anything and had been falling from them most of my life. My cardiologist said he didn't know what was bringing me back. I told him I'm tiny and falling hurts so "pain" was jolting me back.

posted July 1

Related content

View All

Is There A Connection Between Your Stomach And Your Heart? 🩺Today's Monday Medical Video Explores This.🩺

A MyHeartDiseaseTeam Member asked a question 💭

🩺Medical Monday Video 🩺: What Is Coronary Artery Disease?

A MyHeartDiseaseTeam Member asked a question 💭

Something A Little Different This Week For 🩺Medical Monday. 🩺 A Podcast About Healthy Living With Heart Failure

A MyHeartDiseaseTeam Member asked a question 💭
Continue with Facebook
Continue with Google
Lock Icon Your privacy is our priority. By continuing, you accept our Terms of use, and our Health Data and Privacy policies.
Already a Member? Log in